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November 27th, 2007

You are currently browsing the articles from Red Worm Composting written on November 27th, 2007.

Red Worm Composting in the News

The Knoxville News, that is. A little over a week ago I received an e-mail from Rebecca Williams – a writer with the Knoxville News Sentinel – requesting a short interview relating to worm composting (my winter vermicomposting experiment in particular caught her attention).

Here is a blurb from the actual article (published today):

Worm composting is a growing trend all over the world, says Sherman. Large-scale worm growers can sell their compost at a premium. Some cities use worms to reduce landfill waste. Farmers use it to process cattle waste, and home gardeners use worms indoors to compost in the winter.

What makes the worm’s body a perfect little composter?

“Scientists really don’t know,” says Sherman. “That’s one the mysteries about worms.”

There is some debate about the best type of worm for a home compost bin, but most experts agree a type of redworm, Eisenia fetida, is best. They are also called bandling or manure worms, or red wigglers. This is not the same black earthworm you’ll find in the garden.

Redworms are surface feeders who like to eat rich organic matter and don’t mind crowding in a compost bin. They can survive in temperatures from the low 40s up to the 80s, so closed garages, porches or utility rooms are all good spots for them indoors.

Gardeners in northern climates keep worms, too. “My goal is to overcome the cold weather and compost outdoors year-round,” says Bentley Christie of Ontario, Canada. He writes the Web site www.redwormcomposting.com and offers many tips for keeping worms in cold climates.

[emphasis mine]

Pretty hilarious given the long answers I submited to her questions (I replied via email). Oh well! You gotta start somewhere, right? (nice that the website got a mention anyway 🙂 )

Be sure to check out the full article here:
“Classroom experiment demonstrates red wigglers’ ability to produce rich fertilizer”

[UPDATE 2018: Article is no longer on the Knox News website so I removed the link]

Written by Bentley on November 27th, 2007 with 8 comments.
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